MGMT 341Fall 2018, Spring 2019

Business Ethics

Frank Hannafey 韩乐飞
Course Introduction
Frank Hannafey 韩乐飞
Frank Hannafey 韩乐飞Ph.D. and MBA, Loyola University Chicago

Professor and Academic Advisor

Frank has worked in university higher education for many years and has most recently served as a professor at Fairfield University, Fairfield, Connecticut, USA. His teaching, research, and writing is focused in the fields of business ethics and contemporary moral problems. He has lived and pursued research projects in Hong Kong, Yunnan Province, and Guizhou Province. Frank continues his study of the Mandarin Chinese language and is presently engaged in a writing project on Chinese tea– with special focus on Puer Tea from Yunnan Province in southwest China.

Interests
  • Chinese Tea
  • Yoga
  • Travel
  • Walking
  • Reading

Business Ethics

This course is accredited through Loyola University Chicago
Download Syllabus

Course Description

There is a common joke that “business ethics” is an oxymoron, a contradiction in terms. The underlying thought is that “business” is fundamentally amoral, if not immoral; any attempts to consider what ethics or morality demands of business are naïve and wrongheaded. If nothing else, the purpose of this course is to keep you from repeating that annoying joke. The contention of this class is that all business practices have deep ethical assumptions, which are rooted in the moral presuppositions of our social institutions. The question is not whether or not business has ethical underpinnings and requirements; instead we are interested in what the best way is to understand these ethical ideas. We will explore various scholarly responses to this question.

Courses Outcomes

  • Sharpen analytical thinking
  • Learn basic issues and theory in business ethics
  • Practice critical thinking
  • Confront difficult moral questions about the good life, ethical ideals, conflicts between self-interest and morality, and justice
  • Reflect on personal values and their relationship to our social practices